finding what's left of the blues
rebecca, dave, and simone 

rebecca, dave, and simone 

finding what’s left of the blues

somehow, simone and i came up with this idea of a blues road trip from new orleans up through the mississippi delta, to find what’s left of the blues. so many great blues artists came from that area. we wanted to know why, and see what it was like. we found several museums, a lot of “mississippi blues trail” historic markers, and a lot of friendly people, but not much music. we weren’t really interested in seeing young white guys play the blues. i’ve played with many of …uh, relatively young white guys who are great players, steeped in the blues, but creative and soulful, but not the real deal.  i’ve grown tired of the post stevie ray vaughn style of electric blues. i listen to robert johnson, bukka white, mississippi john hurt, son house, etc. the early, seminal, accoustic blues. this blog is a record of what we found in the mississippi delta. 

the so-called mississippi delta is actually an alluvial plain between the mississippi and the yazoo rivers. every spring, the rivers would overflow their banks and flood the delta, leaving behind rich, fertile soil, making it ideal farmland. most of the great blues men worked on farms in this area. the blues, before it reached memphis and chicago, was country music in the truest sense, made by men who worked the land.